church, spiritual

Christmas In July: Celebrating the Ordinary

Yesterday, it was 100° in Dallas, TX. And there was snow. Well, there was fake snow at a "Christmas In July" block party in the city's Bishop Arts district, complete with festive edibles, an ugly sweater contest, and a shorts-and-flip-flops version of Santa Claus. Why? Why celebrate when you're not supposed to be celebrating? To answer… Continue reading Christmas In July: Celebrating the Ordinary

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arts & creativity, church, spiritual

(W)ordinary Time: Learning To Cherish the “Ordinary”

Everyone knows about Easter and Christmas. But what about Ordinary Time? It's by far the longest season in the church calendar, observed by Christian liturgical traditions basically from Epiphany to Ash Wednesday (early January to early March, varying a bit based on the timing of Easter) and from Pentecost to Advent (early June to late… Continue reading (W)ordinary Time: Learning To Cherish the “Ordinary”

spiritual, theological

When Faith Goes Flat

Plenty of blogs, sermons, and songs address what to do when you're down in "the valley of the shadow of death" or up experiencing a "mountaintop moment." But what about when faith goes flat? You rejoice. It surprises me that I'm saying that. And maybe it surprises you too. Because we're familiar with rejoicing when… Continue reading When Faith Goes Flat

work & vocation

Revisiting "Love of Work": How to Be Interested in Uninteresting Work

Yesterday I wrote about "how to love unlovely work," ending that post with the suggestion: "Focus on one interesting aspect of the work, and see if that motivates you to get through the rest." But, immediately after pressing the "publish this" button, I realized that begs the follow-up question: What if there's no interesting aspect… Continue reading Revisiting "Love of Work": How to Be Interested in Uninteresting Work

work & vocation

Revisiting "Love of Work": How to Love Unlovely Work

I just re-read my blog "Perfectionism and 'Love of Work'" from March 2013, which ended with the line: "'love of the work' may be one way to have high standards without perfectionism." That line begs the follow-up question: Can I have "love of the work" when I'm doing work I don't love? If so, how?  Yes,… Continue reading Revisiting "Love of Work": How to Love Unlovely Work